A Plethora of LGBTQIA Poets

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Although all writing is in some way about identity, one of the reasons I enjoy poetry so much is that identity is usually much closer to the surface. Whether the poetry is of the confessional type or not, reading a poem is reading the careful thought-process of the writer and is often about the poet viewing and navigating their world. I am what you might call “nebby,” so having access to such a beautiful and stylized form of writing that reveals so much is very attractive.

When it comes to a poet who identifies within the LGBTQIA community, the question of identity comes even more to the forefront. These identities are intensely personal but made inherently political, so the question of self intersects deeply with the world.

This selection of recent collections of poetry by LGBTQIA-identified poets bears this observation out. Reading the work of these poets can be affirming and tender, eye-opening, and sustaining – all the feelings that might come from getting to know a person better.

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Bodymap

A love song filled with divine secrets of the queer brown disabled sisterhood. You can also check out this title as eBook on OverDrive/Libby.

Holy Wild

Confessional poems of indigenous and trans life. 

If They Come for Us

Asghar’s understanding of herself as a queer Pakistani Muslim woman in America is filtered through an understanding of the generations that came before her. You can also check out this title as eBook on OverDrive/Libby.

Nature Poem

The titular poem takes up the length of the entire book and describes the struggle of a queer, Native American poet to write a nature poem and trying to escape stereotypes and expectations. You can also check out this title as eBook on OverDrive/Libby or as eAudio on Hoopla. 

Nothing Is Okay

A collection from spoken word performer Rachel Wiley incorporating elements of her queerness, fat positivity and intersectional feminism. You can also check out this title as eBook on OverDrive/Libby.

Soft Science

These poems live in the boundaries between human and artificial intelligence, through the lens of queer, Asian American femininity.You can also check out this title as eBook on Hoopla.

The Year of Blue Water

A mix of free verse and prose poems relate a journey of selfhood guided through many practices such as tarot, therapy, and friendship.