Here to Help: Disabilities & Inclusion

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By sharing stories together and having conversations about the books you read, you can help young children understand the world around them. Seeing diverse experiences represented in books helps children to explore their own identities and develop empathy for others.

From physical and developmental vision and hearing impairments, disability encompasses a broad spectrum, and children with and without may have questions. The following books positively portray a range of, enabling children with disabilities to see themselves and introducing children of all abilities people who experience the world in a variety of interesting ways.

Not every book is available at all locations, but any title can be requested. The children’s librarian at your neighborhood library is also here to help, with suggestions for additional titles on topics of interest–or feel free to suggest some titles to us. New books are always being added to the collection.

Hello Goodbye Dog

A student who uses a wheelchair finds a way to see her dog each day in school.

I Like Berries, Do You?

Photographs of young children with Down syndrome enjoying a wide selection of healthful foods, from fruits and veggies to meats and snacks.

Just Because

Encompasses the issue of disability in a charming celebration of sibling friendship.

Laurie

Laurie is a special girl. She doesn’t hear well and that can be hard sometimes. She doesn’t always understand what other people say and playing with other children can be difficult. Luckily there’s the ear doctor. He examines Laurie’s ears and gives her hearing aids.

Lola and I

A story about a special friendship between a young girl and her dog, featuring a surprise ending.

Mama Zooms

A boy’s wonderful mama takes him zooming everywhere with her, because her wheelchair is a zooming machine.

Perfect

Perfect is a story of anticipation, disappointment, acceptance, and, ultimately, love. Suffused with natural imagery.

Some Kids Are Blind

Some people are blind. What does that mean? Using simple, engaging text and full-color photos, readers learn what blindness is, how it can be caused, and what daily life is like for someone who can’t see. This book includes a video, which launches via a 4D app.

Some Kids Are Deaf

Some people are deaf. What does that mean? Using simple, engaging text and full-color photos, readers learn what deafness is, how it can be caused, and what daily life is like for someone who can’t hear.

Some Kids Have Autism

Teach diversity and tolerance to young readers, and help them understand and appreciate those children who have health differences. Colorful photos show kids with disabilities enjoying activities with their peers.

Some Kids Use Wheelchairs

Some people use wheelchairs to get to and from places. What does that mean? Readers learn why someone would use a wheelchair and what daily life is like for someone who can’t walk.

Some Kids Wear Leg Braces

Some people need to wear leg braces. What does that mean? Using simple, engaging text and full-color photos, readers learn how leg braces can help and what daily life is like for someone who wears them.

Susan Laughs

Rhyming couplets describe a wide range of common emotions and activities experienced by a little girl who uses a wheelchair.

We're All Wonders

Augie enjoys the company of his dog, Daisy, and using his imagination, but painfully endures the taunts of his peers because of his facial deformity.