When a Children’s Librarian Reads Grown Up Books…

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I am a children’s and teen librarian, with a pile of picture books and teen fiction always within reach. Exploring titles written for the age groups I serve makes me feel more connected to the reading suggestions I offer.  

Every so often, though, I stray. Sometimes a book is gifted to me, or I am implored to read a particular title by friends. What kind of reading patterns do you have? How might you want to change or break them? 

For this list of suggestions, I am baring the truth of the last four adult books I read. Maybe if you start to read one of these titles, you’ll break your own reading mold! 

You can sign up for a free library card here. If you are new to our eResources, check out these tutorial videos on how to get started.   

If you’re looking for more book suggestions, we’re happy to recommend them to you! Use this Personalized Recommendations form to send us some information about what you like to read and we’ll curate a list just for you.   

If you have any additional questions, you can contact a librarian through FacebookInstagram or Twitter. You can also call us at 412-622-3114 or email us at info@carnegielibrary.org.  

Pachinko

Richly told and profoundly moving, “Pachinko” is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition and loyalty. From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan’s finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee’s complex and passionate characters-strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis-survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history. You can also check out this title as eBook on OverDrive/Libby or as eAudio on OverDrive/Libby.

The Secret Lives of Church Ladies

Short stories explore the raw and tender places where Black women and girls dare to follow their desires and pursue a momentary reprieve from being good. The nine stories in this collection feature four generations of characters grappling with who they want to be in the world, caught as they are between the church’s double standards and their own needs and passions.